Monetize a hobby. While some hobbies actually cost money, others can be transformed into a profitable business venture. Ultimately, it depends on what your hobby is and how talented you are. You could turn your love of photography, for example, into a part-time gig taking family portraits and wedding photos or selling prints on Etsy or at arts fairs.

Those who love teaching but would prefer to make passive income could consider teaching online courses. With online courses, you can teach topics that go beyond what a tutoring gig for students would teach. If you’re great at building stable relationships, you might create a relationships course. If you’re an ecommerce expert, you might teach a course about dropshipping. There’s no limit to what you can teach. You can also niche down within an industry to teach courses about specific subtopics. For example, instead of teaching public relations you might teach a course about growing your blog traffic.


Selling clothes you no longer wear is a quick way to make some money. Start with local consignment shops for faster cash, or use sites like ThredUp and Poshmark to find buyers. If you go the online route, be sure to take clear, well-lit photos of your pieces and research similar items to set competitive prices. Get tips on how to sell your clothing.
Holly told me she started writing content in 2011. At the time, she still worked a full-time job but created content online part-time to supplement her income. Over time, she was able to double and triple her rates until she could quit her full-time job to write. These days, she makes bank as a freelance writer and teaches others to do the same via her online course, Earn More Writing.
Manage social media for businesses. If you have a knack for social media, you could potentially get paid to manage various platforms for others. Many businesses are too busy running day-to-day operations to stay on top of their Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts – and will pay someone with the knowledge and time to do it for them. To find these jobs, ask local businesses and check sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.

Getting a raise is harder than getting a promotion.  Think about it from your boss’s perspective, would you rather a) pay more money for the same service, or b) pay more money for additional responsibilities. Regardless, sometimes a raise is in order, especially if you have worked for several years without one. Check out Ramit Sethi’s guide on asking for a raise.


Along the same lines as trivia, you can get paid for just using your mobile phone and allowing companies to know what you're doing on it. For example, Nielson Mobile Panel is an app that you can earn rewards on just for having it installed. It will take snapshots of what you're doing and use those for advertisers to know more about your demographic. It takes away some privacy, but you get paid for it.
Check with your local bank to see if they're giving away cash bonuses for opening up accounts. Banks run promotions like this all the time, so grab some real cash quickly if you're in need. It won't break the bank (no pun intended) but it will give you a quick $50 or $100 -- maybe even more -- when you really need it. You might need to deposit a minimum amount of cash (usually in the thousands) in order to qualify for these types of accounts (but not always).
Avoid sending copy and paste applications. For example, if you love ‘writing about fitness and relationships’ but are applying for a writing position at a tech company, why would someone want to hire you? You won’t be considered. Recruiters can easily spot a copy and paste application. After all, they lack the specific details that’ll land you the role. Cater each application you write to the brand you’re applying to. 
About the list, this is extremely helpful. I know some coaches who are already earning a lot of money and would choose to get paid for the information that they know but you, you choose to share it to everybody else free of charge. Be a proud brethren of Christ because this is his very attitude. I say this is an act of love. May it be returned to you and your family a million fold.
A dividend payout ratio of about 70% or less suggests plenty of room for further growth. (The payout ratio is the amount of the annual dividend divided by the trailing-12-months' earnings per share, reflecting the portion of earnings being paid out in dividends.) A payout ratio close to or above 100% reflects a company paying out more than it earns, which isn't sustainable. Here are some examples of major companies with significant dividend yields:
The prep work before you open up shop is more time-consuming. You need merchandise to sell, photos and descriptions to post, a name for your shop and a business plan to help you succeed. Once that’s done, you’ll still need to find customers. Depending on what you’re selling, that could take weeks, which is why you should expect the overall time for this gig to be slow.

What are dividend stocks? They are just like regular shares of stock, but with one exception: For every share of a dividend stock that you own, you are paid a small portion of the company’s earnings. Basically, you get paid just for owning the stock! If you are looking to get started with dividend investing, check out Ally Invest (which is included on our list of best investment apps).
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