Moreover, one has the freedom of dressing and can work in casual clad, not necessarily suiting up. For the parents who have to split between home chores like childcare responsibilities, are able to create balance between work and home. One does not have to commute thus saving on gas and also commuting time. Convenience for example in sales where one is closer to clients than when at work. Finally, there is access to a wider pool of applicants for example the disabled who prefer to work from home.
Work as an online interpreter or translator. If you’re fluent in a foreign language, it makes sense to look for work as an online interpreter or translator. Depending on your individual skillset, you could find work translating blog posts or eBooks, transcribing recorded lessons or speeches for clients, or translating through Skype or another online video service. And, thanks to the increased use of foreign languages in the United States, getting started could really pay off. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for interpreters and translators is expected to increase 17% nationally through 2026.
Completing paid surveys is a much easier process. If you know how to give your earnest opinion about a topic, you have all the skills necessary to get started right now. All you're asked to do is share your genuine thoughts and feelings about products, events, marketing campaigns and more. That could mean picking between multiple-choice options or answering a more open-ended question. Either way, the concept is simple and easy to pick up and run with.
According to the FAQ of the net.legends Usenet news group, Dave Rhodes was a student at Columbia Union College (now Washington Adventist University), a Seventh-day Adventist college in Maryland, who wrote the letter and uploaded it as a text file to a nearby BBS around 1987.[2] The earliest posting to Usenet was posted by a David Walton in 1989, also using a Columbia Union College account. Walton referred to himself as, "BIZMAN DAVE THE MODEM SLAVE", and referred to "Dave Rhodes" in his post.[3] The true identity of Dave Rhodes has not been found. A supposed self-published web site by Dave Rhodes was found to be fake.[4][5]
Websites like Survey Junkie will pay you a decent chunk of change for the low-maintenance, borderline mindless task of completing surveys. Companies want to understand consumers better, and one way they do that is by compensating survey-takers (a.k.a. you). Most surveys pay between $0.50 and $1.25, and many of them take less than 5 minutes to do. You can read our full Survey Junkie review for more info.
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